TOPEKA, Kan. — The Latest on the Kansas Legislature’s debate over increasing spending on public schools (all times local):

6 p.m.

Kansas Senate President Susan Wagle says she’s not sure an education funding plan approved by her chamber will satisfy the state Supreme Court.

Wagle and other GOP senators touted the bill passed on a 21-18 vote Thursday as a good-faith effort to comply with a mandate from the high court. The measure would phase in a $274 million increase in education funding over five years.

But asked later whether the plan would satisfy the court, Wagle expressed doubt.

She said: “I’m not sure anything satisfies the Supreme Court.”

The House has passed a plan to phase in a roughly $520 million increase over five years.

The Supreme Court ruled in October that the state’s current funding of more than $4 billion a year is not sufficient under the state constitution.


4:35 p.m.

The Kansas Senate has approved an education funding proposal despite bipartisan skepticism that it increases spending on public schools enough to satisfy a state Supreme Court mandate.

The vote Thursday was 21-18 on a bill that would phase in a $274 million increase in education funding over five years. The measure goes next to the House.

But the House has approved a plan to phase in a roughly $520 million increase over five years. Top Senate Republicans do not believe the state can afford the House plan without increasing taxes within two years.

The final version of the plan will be drafted by negotiators for the two chambers.

The Supreme Court ruled in October that the state’s current education funding of more than $4 billion a year is not sufficient.


2:10 p.m.

An education funding plan backed by top Republicans in the Kansas Senate faces bipartisan skepticism over whether it increases spending on public schools enough to satisfy a court mandate.

The Senate debated a bill Thursday that would phase in a $274 million increase in school funding over five years and target some of the new money to early childhood education.

Republicans backing the bill weren’t sure they had enough support to pass it because the Senate’s GOP majority appeared split. Democrats doubted that the plan is large enough.

The Kansas Supreme Court ruled in October that the state’s current education funding of more than $4 billion a year is not sufficient.

The House has passed a plan to phase in a roughly $520 million increase over five years.