The Republic Masthead

Analysis of 2012 NFL Draft offers key investment lessons


Follow The Republic:


In March 2012, this writer asked whether owning the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft was a “franchise savior” or “fool’s gold.”

The Indianapolis Colts owned the top pick, and it was a “no-brainer” — they should pick Andrew Luck, a “once-in-a-generation” quarterback.

Or was it?

Similar to the financial markets, the hysteria surrounding the NFL draft has grown rapidly. We can now watch the NFL Scouting Combine live and then be subjected to a barrage of opinions from savants and soothsayers as to which players’ draft stock skyrocketed or plummeted and who the teams should pick. It’s the same jabbering, just a different channel (ESPN vs. CNBC).

Hoosier natives Tobias Moskowitz, professor at the University of Chicago, and sports journalist Jon Wertheim wrote “Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won.”

They found the NFL draft to be rife with false beliefs and destructive decision-making. Teams consistently place excessive value on high draft picks and routinely overpay, in terms of current and future picks, to move up. An analysis of the first two picks of the 2012 NFL draft sheds some light.

Luck’s first two seasons were very strong, and he was named an alternate for the Pro Bowl both seasons. While this pick unquestionably worked out well for the Colts, we don’t know what other teams offered to trade for the pick.

Interestingly, Russell Wilson (drafted by Seattle in the third round and the sixth quarterback drafted) made the regular 2014 Pro Bowl roster and already has a Super Bowl ring.

The Washington, D.C., team viewed Robert Griffin III as another “franchise” quarterback and was willing to pay a king’s ransom to move up four spots to the St. Louis Rams’ No. 2 spot. Washington offered its first-round (No. 6 overall) and second-round (No. 39) picks in 2012, as well as its first-round picks in 2013 (No. 22) and 2014 (No. 2). The Rams parlayed the 2012 and 2013 picks into four starters. Ironically, due to Washington’s collapse in 2013, the Rams still own the same No. 2 overall pick it did before the 2012 trade.

Griffin was named the AP’s NFL Rookie of the Year for 2012. Injured late, he suffered through a dismal 2013.

Whether he develops into a franchise quarterback remains a question mark.

Professors Richard Thaler, Chicago, and Cade Massey, Yale, studied 13 drafts and tracked the subsequent performance of the players. Higher picks performed better than lower picks, on average, but not significantly better. Surprisingly, the top-drafted player at a position performed better than the fourth only 56 percent of the time. For slightly better odds versus a coin flip, teams paid a huge premium.

Investors and NFL general managers overestimate their ability to pick winners and underestimate the role of luck. “Scorecasting” suggests teams with a top pick consider trading it for multiple lower picks from a team desperate to move up. The more picks you have, the better chance you have to get lucky.

“Slow and steady wins the race” is a value investing mindset also applicable to building a NFL roster.

Choose overlooked or undervalued prospects, not the Heisman Trophy winner or Twitter. It seems dull but will increase your chances of winning Super Bowls and the long-term investing game.

Mickey Kim is the chief operating officer and chief compliance officer for Columbus-based investment adviser Kirr Marbach & Co. He can be reached at 376-9444 or mickey@kirrmarr.com.

Don't settle for a preview.
Subscribe today to see the full story!

  • Hybrid
  • $11/month
  • Sat / Sun Delivery
  • Sat / Sun Coupons
  • Weekend Magazines
  • Full Digital Access
  • E-Edition Access
  • Buy Now
  • Premium
  • $16/month
  • 7-Day Print Delivery
  • All coupons
  • Special Magazines
  • Full Digital Access
  • E-Edition Access
  • Buy Now
  • Digital Only
  • $11/month
  • -
  • -
  • -
  • Full Digital Access
  • E-Edition Access
  • Buy Now

Think your friends should see this? Share it with them!

All comments are moderated before posting. Your email address must be verified with Disqus in order for your comment to appear. If your comments consistently or intentionally make this site a less civil and enjoyable place to be, your comments will be excluded from it.
View our commenting guidelines and FAQ's here.

All content copyright ©2014 The Republic, a division of Home News Enterprises unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved. Privacy policy.