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Homeland Security adding air security 'enhancements' amid Russian jet crash probe


WASHINGTON — The Homeland Security Department announced Friday a series of new security efforts aimed at international airports in the wake of the crash of a Russian jetliner over Egypt's Sinai Peninsula.

DHS Secretary said the latest security protocols will focus on commercial flights bound for the United States from certain overseas airports in the region. He did not say which airports will be affected.

The new security procedures will include expanded security screening of items put on commercial jets, airport assessments and offers of security assistance for certain airports.

Russian carrier Metrojet's Airbus A321-200 crashed shortly after takeoff from the Sharm el-Sheikh airport in Egypt on Saturday, killing all 224 people on board. There are no direct flights from that airport to the United States.

Though the investigation is ongoing, President has said the U.S. is taking "very seriously" the possibility that a bomb caused the crash.

British Prime Minister said he has grounded all British flights to and from the Sinai Peninsula because of "intelligence and information" that points to a bomb as the probable cause of the crash.

On Friday, Russia announced that it will suspend all flights to Egypt until security is improved at its airports.

Michael Balboni, a security expert and former deputy secretary for public safety for New York state, said there are significant differences in the scrutiny of airport workers at overseas airports than in the United States. And in the wake of the downing of the Russian flight, those gaps are likely to gain renewed attention.

"Everything needs a refresh," Balboni said. "Security is never a destination, it's a journey. You have to change it up, you have to refresh it."

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