the republic logo

Amy Winehouse's family criticizes documentary about singer due to premiere at Cannes

bug
Share/Save/Bookmark

LONDON — The family of Amy Winehouse has criticized a documentary about the late singer that is due to have its premiere at next month's Cannes Film Festival.

A statement issued Sunday by family spokesman Chris Goodman said director Asif Kapadia's "Amy" is "misleading and contains some basic untruths."

The statement said the film suggested family members did too little to help the singer, who died in July 2011 at age 27 of accidental alcohol poisoning. The soul diva, whose 2006 album "Back to Black" won five Grammy Awards, had battled drug and alcohol abuse for years.

PHOTO: FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2007 file photo, British singer Amy Winehouse poses for photographs after being interviewed by The Associated Press at a studio in north London. The family of Amy Winehouse has criticized a documentary about the late singer that is due to have its premiere at next month's Cannes Film Festival.A statement issued Sunday, April 26, 2015 by family spokesman Chris Goodman said director Asif Kapadia's "Amy" is "misleading and contains some basic untruths." The statement said the film suggested family members did too little to help the singer, who died in July 2011, aged 27, after battling drug and alcohol abuse. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2007 file photo, British singer Amy Winehouse poses for photographs after being interviewed by The Associated Press at a studio in north London. The family of Amy Winehouse has criticized a documentary about the late singer that is due to have its premiere at next month's Cannes Film Festival.A statement issued Sunday, April 26, 2015 by family spokesman Chris Goodman said director Asif Kapadia's "Amy" is "misleading and contains some basic untruths." The statement said the film suggested family members did too little to help the singer, who died in July 2011, aged 27, after battling drug and alcohol abuse. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

The family statement said the movie did not reflect the "huge effort from all concerned to help Amy at all stages."

"Fundamentally, the Winehouse family believes that the film does a disservice to individuals and families suffering from the complicated affliction of addiction," it said.

The filmmakers said in a statement that they began work with "total objectivity" and the support of the Winehouse family. They said the documentary was the result of interviews with about 100 people who knew the singer, including "friends, family, former partners and members of the music industry that worked with her."

Kapadia won wide acclaim with "Senna," a documentary about the late motor racing champion Ayrton Senna.

"Amy" is due to screen out of competition at the May 13-24 Cannes festival.

Think your friends should see this? Share it with them!

Story copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Feedback, Corrections and Other Requests: AP welcomes feedback and comments from readers. Send an email to info@ap.org and it will be forwarded to the appropriate editor or reporter.


We also have more stories about:
(click the phrases to see a list)

Category:

Follow The Republic:

All content copyright ©2015 The Republic, a division of Home News Enterprises unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved. Privacy policy.