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US "disappointed" with Iran's response to UN probe of allegations it worked on nuke arms

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VIENNA — A U.S. envoy says Washington is disappointed with Iran over the degree of cooperation it has shown with the U.N. nuclear agency's attempts to probe whether Tehran ever worked on atomic arms.

PHOTO: FILE - In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014, file photo, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks to the media after closed-door nuclear talks on Iran take place in Vienna, Austria. Iran and six world powers are closer than ever to a deal that would crimp Tehran’s ability to make nuclear arms _ a status that would lead to a progressive end to sanctions on the Islamic Republic and ease tensions that could boil over into a new Middle East war. The bad news? Substantial differences remain. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014, file photo, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks to the media after closed-door nuclear talks on Iran take place in Vienna, Austria. Iran and six world powers are closer than ever to a deal that would crimp Tehran’s ability to make nuclear arms _ a status that would lead to a progressive end to sanctions on the Islamic Republic and ease tensions that could boil over into a new Middle East war. The bad news? Substantial differences remain. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)

A report this month from the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency said the investigation has made no headway for months despite pledges by Iranian leaders to cooperate.

The IAEA has tried to follow up on the allegations for more than a decade, with little success. Iran denies it has any interest in — or is working on — such weapons.

U.S. envoy Laura Kennedy said Monday Washington is disappointed with Iran's "failure thus far, to constructively engage on this issue." She spoke a day before the start of talks focused on reducing the scope of Tehran's nuclear programs.

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PHOTO: In this Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014, file photo, from left, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, European Union High Representative Catherine Ashton, and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif are photographed as they participate in a trilateral meeting in Vienna, Austria. Iran and six world powers are closer than ever to a deal that would crimp Tehran’s ability to make nuclear arms - a status that would lead to a progressive end to sanctions on the Islamic Republic and ease tensions that could boil over into a new Middle East war. The bad news? Substantial differences remain. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, Pool, File)
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