the republic logo

Djokovic deals with Federer, fans for 2nd US Open title, 3rd major of 2015, 10th of career


NEW YORK — After winning a point in the U.S. Open final, and bent on proving a point, leaped and roared and threw an uppercut, then glared at some of the thousands of spectators pulling for .

Following another point in that game, Djokovic nodded as he smiled toward the stands. And moments later, Djokovic shook his right arm, bloodied by an early fall, and screamed, "Yes! Yes!" to celebrate a missed forehand by Federer.

Djokovic appeared to be all alone out there in Arthur Ashe Stadium, trying to solve Federer while also dealing with a crowd loudly supporting the 17-time major champion proclaimed "arguably the greatest player in the history of the sport" during prematch introductions.

In the end, Djokovic handled everything in a thrill-a-minute final on a frenetic night. Thwarting Federer with his relentless defense and unparalleled returning, Djokovic took control late and held on for a 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4 victory Sunday to earn his second U.S. Open title, third major championship of the year and 10th Grand Slam trophy in all.

"We pushed each other to the limit," the No. 1-ranked Djokovic said, "as we always do."

Djokovic, who is 63-5 in 2015, including 27-1 at majors, said he understood why the crowd backed Federer but hopes to someday get that sort of support.

"You do let sometimes certain things to distract you," Djokovic said about interacting with the fans. "But it's important to get back on the course and go back to basics and why you are there and what you need to do."

Certainly was able to do that.

Contorting his body this way and that, sneakers squeaking loudly as he changed directions or scraping like sandpaper as he slid to reach unreachable shots, Djokovic forced the 34-year-old Federer to put the ball into the tiniest of spaces. Federer wound up with 54 unforced errors, 17 more than Djokovic.

Another key statistic: Djokovic won 10 of the first 12 points that lasted at least 10 strokes.

Perhaps the most pivotal of all: Djokovic saved 19 of the 23 break points he faced, while winning six of Federer's service games.

"Some of them, I could have done better, should have done better," the second-ranked Federer said.

From late in the third set to 5-2 in the fourth, Djokovic took control against a wilting Federer by claiming eight of 10 games. Federer made one last stand, breaking to get within 5-3 and holding for 5-4, but a forehand return that flew long left Djokovic as the champion, pointing to his heart.

After all the attention paid to ' bid for the first calendar-year Grand Slam, which ended with a semifinal loss at the U.S. Open, it's Djokovic who reached all four finals. He beat at the Australian Open in January, lost to Stan Wawrinka at the French Open in June, then beat Federer at Wimbledon in July.

The 28-year-old from Serbia also won a trio of majors in 2011 — including his only other title in New York in five previous finals — and his career total ranks tied for seventh-most in history behind Federer.

Djokovic evened his head-to-head record with Federer at 21-all. They have met in three of the last six Grand Slam finals, and Djokovic is 3-0 in those. It is as spectacular a rivalry as there is in tennis right now, with contrasting styles of play.

"Being back in a final is where you want to be," said Federer, who owns five U.S. Open titles but last played for the championship in 2009. "Playing a great champion like Novak is a massive challenge."

His coach, Stefan Edberg, figures an 18th major title is still not out of reach, even though no one Federer's age has won the U.S. Open since 1970.

"You still cannot count him out," Edberg said. "If he keeps playing at this level, he'll get another shot."

Djokovic sounded as if he agreed, saying about Federer: "He's just not going away."

Rain began falling about 10 minutes before they were supposed to head out from the locker room, and the start of the match was delayed for more than three hours, beginning after 7 p.m. Won't happen again: The U.S. Tennis Association is in the midst of constructing a retractable roof expected to be ready for next year's tournament.

In the third game, Djokovic slipped as he raced forward and fell, ripping skin off his hand, elbow and knee. Shaken, he lost six of the next seven points, then got treatment from a trainer.

Still, all of four Federer service games into the match, Djokovic earned four breaks. That was the same total managed by Federer's opponents in 82 service games across his previous six matches. Federer also hadn't lost a set until Sunday.

If there were many folks in favor of Djokovic in the 23,771-capacity arena, they were tough to hear. Instead — and make no mistake, Djokovic noticed — a vast majority were on Federer's side, even applauding faults by Djokovic, considered poor tennis etiquette. Over and over, chair umpire Eva Asderaki-Moore, the first woman to officiate a U.S. Open men's singles final, held up a hand the way a school teacher might and asked for quiet.

"Was it louder than ever? Maybe," Federer said. "It was unreal."

Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at

PHOTO: Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after winning a point against Roger Federer, of Switzerland, during the men's championship match of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after winning a point against Roger Federer, of Switzerland, during the men's championship match of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Think your friends should see this? Share it with them!

Story copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Feedback, Corrections and Other Requests: AP welcomes feedback and comments from readers. Send an email to and it will be forwarded to the appropriate editor or reporter.

Photo Gallery:
PHOTO: Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after defeating Roger Federer, of Switzerland, in the men's championship match of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Click to view (14 Photos)
We also have more stories about:
(click the phrases to see a list)


Follow The Republic:

All content copyright ©2015 The Republic, a division of Home News Enterprises unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved. Privacy policy.