the republic logo

Obama faces familiar question about Congress' role if he moves toward airstrikes in Syria

bug
Share/Save/Bookmark

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama faces a familiar question as he contemplates airstrikes in Syria: Should Congress have a say in his decision?

Just last summer Obama was barreling toward strikes in Syria when he abruptly announced that he first wanted approval from congressional lawmakers. But Congress balked at Obama's request, and the strikes were eventually scrapped.

PHOTO: White House press secretary Josh Earnest briefs reporters during the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Earnest started his briefing with a question on Syria. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
White House press secretary Josh Earnest briefs reporters during the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Earnest started his briefing with a question on Syria. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

This time around, the White House is suggesting it may not be necessary to get a sign-off from Congress.

While cautioning that Obama has made no final decisions, officials say there is a difference between last year's effort to attack Syria's government in retaliation for chemical weapons use and a bombing campaign against Islamic State militants threatening Americans in the region.

Earlier this month, Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq.

Think your friends should see this? Share it with them!

Story copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Feedback, Corrections and Other Requests: AP welcomes feedback and comments from readers. Send an email to info@ap.org and it will be forwarded to the appropriate editor or reporter.


We also have more stories about:
(click the phrases to see a list)

Category:

Follow The Republic:

All content copyright ©2014 The Republic, a division of Home News Enterprises unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved. Privacy policy.