Retirement from one’s full-time career can be perceived as an ending, if you will. But one retiree is a good example that it can be a starting point for new, meaningful adventures that can have positive impacts.

Bob Calderone’s career in the auto industry included a stint at Arvin Industries in Columbus, where he finished as vice president in the aftermarket business.

Retirement offers one the opportunity to relax and focus on things they’ve yearned to do. Some use it instead as an opportunity to contribute in new ways. Calderone was one such person.

He became a mentor to local elementary school students at Fodrea and Southside, helping them with math and English for 13 years until stopping recently at age 91. The beloved Mr. C was known for making learning easy and fun.

He had other volunteer roles, too. At Mill Race Center he was Bampaw the Clown, using the character to spread laughter. He has helped at St. Bartholomew Catholic Church and also with SCORE, an organization in which retired executives help entrepreneurs start small businesses and find success.

Calderone said he enjoyed seeing the reactions of the people on the receiving end of his volunteerism. His donation of time and talent positively impact the lives of many people of all ages — whether brightening their day or helping them achieve a breakthrough.

What he’s done in retirement is a good example for others who are approaching the end of their full-time careers and may seek new means of personal fulfillment. His example is particularly relevant in Bartholomew County, where the age 50-plus population is the largest of all populations at 34 percent, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

That has a benefit, though. Talented retirees willing to donate their time and talents to assist individuals and organizations only make the community better.

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