COLUMBUS, Ind. — A group called the Midwestern Alliance has distributed posters at public locations in Columbus in support of its goal to establish a white ethnic state in Midwestern states.

The posters, which say the group is looking for young Midwestern patriots, were spotted Monday morning by a city employee and removed from four ColumBUS shelters around the city and a utility pole at Third and Franklin streets, city officials said.

A call to action is included on the Midwestern Alliance website: “As the number of nonwhites in our country increases, the time for whites to stand up for our people is now more than ever. If we fail to do so, our race will become extinct and our civilization will be swept into the dustbin of history.”

A man who identified himself as Sam Hyde, who said he handles the alliance’s website articles and the organization’s training, said in an email to The Republic that the alliance has 2,070 members, although he declined to identify the location of its headquarters.

Hyde said posters were distributed in Columbus “because we have a large presence in and around that city, and seek to spread our message to like-minded Midwestern whites who are as of yet unaware of the movement.”

He said the regional poster campaign began late in the summer with distribution in Missouri and Illinois.

“Whites in the Midwest and across the U.S. as a whole are waking up to the fact that they are being demographically replaced,” Hyde said.

Mayor Jim Lienhoop said that he is disappointed with this week’s development, the second time in about a month that a white supremacy group has distributed information in Columbus.

Yet, the mayor was careful to reiterate a message of Columbus’ spirit of equality, fairness and inclusion.

“There is no place in the city of Columbus, or society at large, for racist ideology espoused by the group represented on this flyer, or any other white supremacist group. Their views are in direct opposition to the values we live by of equality, justice and fair play,” he said.

Read more in Thursday’s print edition of The Republic

Columbus Mayor Jim Lienhoop, left, and Aida Ramirez, director of the Columbus Human Rights Commission, listen as Columbus Police Lt. Matt Harris talks about the police investigation into white nationalist posters placed around Columbus during a meeting in the mayor's office in Columbus City Hall in Columbus, Ind., Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017. Mary Ferdon, executive director of administration and community development for the city, also attended the meeting. The mayor denounced racist material found in the city for the second time in a month. Mike Wolanin | The Republic
Columbus Mayor Jim Lienhoop, left, and Aida Ramirez, director of the Columbus Human Rights Commission, listen as Columbus Police Lt. Matt Harris talks about the police investigation into white nationalist posters placed around Columbus during a meeting in the mayor’s office in Columbus City Hall in Columbus, Ind., Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017. Mary Ferdon, executive director of administration and community development for the city, also attended the meeting. The mayor denounced racist material found in the city for the second time in a month. Mike Wolanin | The Republic
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Brian Blair is a reporter for The Republic. He can be reached at bblair@therepublic.com or 812-379-5672.