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Indiana's religious objections law turmoil likely back for 2016 legislative, election debates

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INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana's legislative session wrapped up with little talk of this year's biggest controversy, but don't expect the Religious Freedom Restoration Act turmoil to go away.

Republican Gov. Mike Pence and GOP legislative leaders tried to steer clear of talking about the religious objections law after the legislative session ended last week.

PHOTO: Senate President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne, addreses the Indiana Senate on the final day of the 2015 legislative session at the Statehouse in Indianapolis, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. Indiana lawmakers are expected to work into the night Wednesday to wrap up the 2015 legislative session, signing off on a new two-year state budget and putting contentious issues such as control over the State Board of Education and a religious objections law behind them. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
Senate President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne, addreses the Indiana Senate on the final day of the 2015 legislative session at the Statehouse in Indianapolis, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. Indiana lawmakers are expected to work into the night Wednesday to wrap up the 2015 legislative session, signing off on a new two-year state budget and putting contentious issues such as control over the State Board of Education and a religious objections law behind them. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

The national furor over whether the law would permit discrimination against gays and lesbians caused a Statehouse scramble to quickly add nondiscrimination language to it.

Democrats plan to push next year to add protections for sexual orientation and gender identity to Indiana's civil rights law. The issue also promises to be a factor in the 2016 gubernatorial race.

Pence says he regrets the controversy but believes the state has been able to move on.

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